Development of Achilles tendon elongation and its effect on physical function the first year after rupture

Development of Achilles tendon elongation and its effect on physical function the first year after rupture: A prospective cohort study

Primary investigator

Maria Swennergren Hansen, PT, MSc, PhD student1,2

Primary supervisor

Kristoffer Weisskirchner Barfod, MD, PhD, læge1

Co-supervisors

Morten Tange Kristensen, PT, PhD, seniorforsker2, 3

Jesper Bencke, MSc, PhD, leder af ganglaboratoriet4

Prof. Per Hølmich, MD, DMSc, professor1

Affiliations

  1. Sports Orthopedic Research Center – Copenhagen (SORC-C), Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Copenhagen University Hospital Amager-Hvidovre, Denmark.

  2. Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Research-Copenhagen (PMR-C); Department of Physical and Occupational Therapy, and Clinical Research Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital Amager-Hvidovre, Denmark.

  3. Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Copenhagen University Hospital Amager-Hvidovre, Denmark.

  4. Human Movement Analysis Laboratory, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Copenhagen University Hospital Amager-Hvidovre, Denmark.

About the study

All patients treated for an acute Achilles tendon rupture at Amager-Hvidovre Hospital from June 2018 are offered to participate in the study. 

The study cohort from the trial: "Achilles tendon elongation and gait pattern after rupture: A three armed randomized controlled trial comparing an individualized treatment algorithm vs. operative or non-operative treatment" (read about it here) is included in this cohort. 

Patients are followed closely in order to describe the development in tendon length from time of rupture to one year post rupture. The cohort will be assessed at the following time points: in the acute phase, at 3 weeks and 2, 4, 6, and 12 months after injury. 

Primary outcome is the Copenhagen Achilles Length Measure.

Purpose of the study

To examine how elongation of the Achilles tendon develops during the first year after rupture among patients treated both operatively and non-operatively, and how it affects physical function. 

The aim is to define a cutoff of acceptable elongation dividing the patients who obtain normal physical function (Limb Symmetry Index > 90%) from those who do not.

Time plan

Recruitment of patients started in June 2018 and is expected to span until August 2019 with follow up for one year.

ClinicalTrial.gov identifier

NCT03525314  

Funded by

The Department of Orthopedic Surgery and the Department of Physical and Occupational Therapy, Copenhagen University Hospital Hvidovre, Denmark. DJO Global Inc. Amager-Hvidovre hospitals forskningsfond. Fysioterapipraksisfonden.

Responsible editor